Albo Speaks and Other Horrors

By Loudoun Insider

Dave Albo tries to explain himself, the Post’s sports writers get in on the “fun”, and even staunchly conservative blog BVBL can’t help but criticize the idiotic behavior of the Republican dominated Virginia House of Delegates, calling it Speaker Howell’s Frat House.  Great job down there in Richmond, guys.


Comments

  • Eric the 1/2 troll says:

    All this talk of voter ID is fascinating. But Barb has yet to answer this question…

    “Which bill are we not looking at that shows that the GA’s priorities really ARE jobs and taxes and that will have us screaming because we weren’t paying attention?”

    Is it NOT a valid question due a response, Barb?

  • edmundburkenator says:

    Hillsboro, isn’t that what is there now?

    Here is what is in place to vote now:

    Virginia voter identification card
    Valid Virginia driver’s license
    Military ID
    Any Federal, Virginia state or local government-issued ID
    Employer issued photo ID card
    Social Security card

    Any voter who forgets to bring acceptable ID to the polls may still vote but, will be requested to sign, under oath, an Affirmation of Identity form affirming that he/she is the voter he/she claims to be. A voter who requires assistance to vote by reason of physical disability or an inability to read or write may, if he so requests, also be assisted in completing this statement.

    The bill dials up the Affirmation of Identity component by making the voter come back to the polls with one of the approved IDs — which I believe is going to be expanded to include utility bill statements.

  • Liz Miller says:

    Wow, Barbara, I want to live in your world where volunteers are free for the number of business hours it would take to do a coordinated effort to get everyone who needs one an ID.

    Generally, volunteer organizations do most of their work during evenings and weekends.

  • edmundburkenator says:

    Yeah… Eric is probably right, this isn’t a Voter ID thread, but it is interesting. No?

    Liz, if they include utility bills or a bank statement to the existing list above, what are the arguments against those forms of “ID”.

  • Hillsboro says:

    e.b., those are the ID requirements in the bill that just passed the senate. And I missed including county-issued ID cards, such as library cards in my summary.

    Summary:
    http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?121+sum+HB9

    Full text of passed bill:
    http://lis.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/legp604.exe?121+ful+HB9S1

  • Liz Miller says:

    Well, my argument is that they’re along it harder for people to vote, ostensibly to prevent fraud. But fraud by individual voters isn’t actually occurring. Fraud is occurring during counting (witness Maine’s primary this year). So what is the real purpose of these laws if the problem they say they will solve doesn’t exist? The purpose is to prevent certain people from voting.

    And that offends me as a citizen.

  • Liz Miller says:

    “Along” was supposed to read “making”

  • Liz Miller says:

    And isn’t the Republican Party supposed to be the party of smaller government, less bureauocracy, and cutting the red tape? How do voter ID laws mesh with that?

  • Barbara Munsey says:

    eb, why do you have a problem with showing that their “skin” is that of an American citizen registered to vote in the jurisdiction?

    Only time I’ve ever seen you wave a flag–good for you!
    ————————————
    Eric, I asked how many bills had been proposed, which elicited that question and the switch to why voter ID is a terrible horrible no good very bad thing. Also offensive. Still waiting for an answer on that one.
    ————————————–
    Liz, I don’t have a world. Fortunately, none of us does, some statements by some activists to the contrary. Sorry, but as long as I have to have a picture ID to buy my (legal, and heavily taxed–if the nanny-staters were honest they’d outlaw them, right? Can’t give up that revenue stream to build completely unrelated prok amenities in tobacco states, though. sigh) cigarettes, I have no problem with proving who I am to vote.

    I think the voting is more important than the cigarettes, you see.

  • liz says:

    Again, cigarettes are a privilege. Alcohol is a privilege. Voting is a right.

    A right.

    And it is the fundamental basis of this grand experiment of American Democracy, that for better or for worse, we get to choose who governs us. And if those who govern limit who gets to choose who gets to govern, then Democracy gets hurt, badly.

    And still, you’re not saying how this bill helps jobs and taxes. Nor are you saying how it comports with the smaller government ideals of the Republican party.

  • Ben Dover says:

    Not to take this thread any further off course, but, Barbara, I hope you can quit the cigarettes.

  • Elder Berry says:

    Barbara Munsey? Barbara?

    Crickets.

  • liz says:

    Elder, that’s not fair, it’s been less than an hour and I’m sure Barbara has other things going on in her life.

  • Dan says:

    “Crickets.”

    Of course, you hear nothing but crickets. How do you expect Barbara to answer that question. There is no good answer. Or, more properly, the answer is painfully obvious.

    The Republicans (and their fearless leader Bob for Jobs) appealed for votes on economic issues telling voters that was their priority. They have treated us to (and entertained the nation with) their crazy every sperm is sacred bill and their punish the harlots bill to the exclusion of what they told the voters they would be about.

    I don’t know why this should shock anyone. We saw the same thing on the national level. In 2010 the Republicans rode a bad economy to a majority in the House of Representatives. They told voters they were all about economic issues then too. That was their priority they told us. And come January 2011 they churned out abortion bills and bills redefining rape (had to be sure it was rapey enough for them before the bill would be paid for an abortion).

    One can only hope that Mr. Albo has done a public service by being such an ass in such a public fashion. Maybe more voters will wake up to the fact that you can’t trust what these guys say when they need your vote. That there is a history of these guys talking the economy and as soon as you give them the keys this is what you get.

    Jobs and the economy are most decidedly NOT a priority with these clowns. They are all about fringe nutzery. And they prove it over and over again. Maybe enough voters will finally catch on. One can hope.

    I think Bob for Jobs (what a joke) can kiss that Vice Presidential nomination he has been salivating over goodbye. Ain’t gonna happen. The only VP that’s going to be associated with McDonnell is Vaginal Probe.

    Willard Mitt Romney / Bob Vaginal Probe McDonnell.

    Won’t fit on a bumper sticker.

  • Eric the 1/2 troll says:

    I wrote:

    ‘“Which bill are we not looking at that shows that the GA’s priorities really ARE jobs and taxes and that will have us screaming because we weren’t paying attention?”

    Is it NOT a valid question due a response, Barb?”

    To which Bar responded:

    “Eric, I asked how many bills had been proposed, which elicited that question and the switch to why voter ID is a terrible horrible no good very bad thing. Also offensive. Still waiting for an answer on that one.”

    Not an answer, Barb, unless you are trying to contend that the Voter ID law demonstrates that the GOP controlled GA priorities are really jobs and taxes. If so, I really don’t see it.

    So, I will re-ask the question, Barb, in a truncated version so maybe you can try to actually answer it:

    “Which bill shows that the GA’s priorities really ARE jobs and taxes?”

    Is that concise enough for you?

  • Dan says:

    The five D’s of dodgeball:

    Dodge, duck, dip, dive and dodge.

    Jobs, taxes and the economy? You didn’t think they really meant that stuff did you? That would be no fun at all.

    It’s not so much that they were lying. I believe the immortal Elwood Blues said it best when he said:

    “That wasn’t lies. That was just bullshit.”

    You see, the Republicans in Richmond weren’t lying to the voters. They were just bullshitting them. It’s an entirely different thing.

  • Hillsboro says:

    >> “Which bill shows that the GA’s priorities really ARE jobs and taxes?”

    Barbara Comstock’s HB-33, which prohibits Virginia tax dollars from going to any project with a mandatory Project Labor Agreement.

    Jobs and taxes…. preventing Virginia tax dollars from going to create jobs primarily for Maryland workers.

    WMATA recently disclosed that over 50% of the jobs under Phase I’s PLA have gone to Maryland residents.

  • Dan says:

    Hillsboro, so we withhold money from Phase II and the money is made up through higher tolls paid by commuters. The anti-union fetish of Republican ideology is satisfied and the average Joe gets screwed. Tell Sen. Comstock no thanks.

  • Hillsboro says:

    Jobs and taxes my friend.

    The pro-Union fetish of Democratic ideology isn’t going to win this battle.

    In fact, I think WMATA’s intransigence on this issue and on seating the new Virginia representatives may well be the death knell to Phase II.

  • edmundburkenator says:

    “eb, why do you have a problem with showing that their “skin” is that of an American citizen registered to vote in the jurisdiction?”

    How does this bill do that? Handing a poll worker a utility bill doesn’t do that…

  • liz says:

    What EB said.

    The problem the bill is supposed to fix doesn’t exist. And if it did, the bill as written wouldn’t fix that problem.

    So what is the purpose of the bill? Either it’s just theatrics or it’s designed to do exactly what it will do, make it harder for poor, physically disabled, or elderly citizens to vote.

  • Barbara Munsey says:

    Liz, “cigarettes are a privilege. Alcohol is a privilege.”?

    Really? Soon to be joined by trans fats, HFCS, meat? That we will graciously be allowed to nibble around the edges of in a temporary privilege granted by those who know best, until we can be forcibly weaned for our own good?

    I would place them as commodities. (At least in the real world–I won’t say “reality based world”, because that seems to me at least to be a rather self-serving meme propounded by those who prefer that their own definition be mandated on others.)

    I agree that voting is a right, but it is also a privilege, and as eb notes, people have died to protect it. It is the responsibility of those of us who enjoy it to protect it too in an everyday way, and one of the ways to do that is to make sure that it isn’t cheapened by being held to a lower standard than the ability to engage in the use of legal commodities, like beer, wine, cigars.

    I can see what may be your point, and you are consistent in it by placing abortion and birth control as rights that should also have extremely limited standards attached–for free, on demand, as few rules as possible.

    But I would posit to you that abortion and birth control are also commodities (perhaps even privileges). If we regulate something like beer, tax it, and invest vast amounts of the economy in doing so, then it stands to reason that those who don’t perhaps share your worldview on “privileges” and rights might wish to regulate them as stringently, or more so.

    I place voting in a higher category (as you do in relation to beer or cigs), and feel it should be held to a higher standard.

    (Thanks btw for noting to elderberry that I don’t necessarily respond on a dogwhistle–was out most of yesterday afternoon. elderberry, still waiting: 14, or 84? If the latter, you at least can tacitly command the manners due an elder, and some leeway on being a cranky old scold. If the former, whatever dude/babe.)
    ——————————————————-

    bendover, thank you.

    ——————————————————-

    Eric, I would take a look at the entire list proposed, and see which ones moved forward in relation to transportation and taxes. (i.e.–my original question having to do with how many other bills there are)

    ———————————————————–

    eb, it’s a hell of a lot better than nothing. See remarks to Liz: I think voting should be held to a higher standard than beer. Do we just take someone’s word on that? Have them sign a provisional affidavit and ring up the malt liquor? no.

    But since beer is a “privilege”…

    (like sugar? stay tuned)

  • liz says:

    I suppose I would be more upset about it if I smoked cigarettes or drank alcohol. I admit that I do get upset about not being able to buy cold medicine without signing a book, but then I’m in favor of repealing the drug laws and removing the age limit on alcohol.

    The addictiveness and deadliness of cigarettes, and the fact that most people start smoking before they hit 16 makes me less eager to eliminate that age limit, but I’d actually prefer that the manufacturers be held to the fire than that purchasers be inconvenienced.

  • Eric the 1/2 troll says:

    “The five D’s of dodgeball:

    Dodge, duck, dip, dive and dodge.”

    Barb, you must have been HELL in gym class…

  • BlackOut says:

    Barbara, don’t you think cigarette cessation drug therapy and meds should not be covered by medical insurance?

    i see a parallel here between cigarettes and sex. If contraceptives are not to be covered by insurance shouldn’t cigarette meds also not be covered. Same rational. Doesn’t really matter if it is called a privilege, commodity or something else.

  • Barbara Munsey says:

    I accept the regulations on those commodities, because I accept the fact that those regulations are arrived at by those whom we vote into a position of authority to regulate them.

    Which is why I support holding the practice of voting to a higher standard than the practice of smoking, drinking, buying a Trojan Magnum, and so on.

  • Glen Bayless says:

    Do none of you remember the days of poll taxes and literacy tests? My mom used to come home from working at the polls truly saddened by the number of people turned away…this was Arlington in the 50′s. I would be more sympathetic to the views of those clamoring for this type of legislation if a. There was a demonstrable problem and b. We did not have such a sorry history of voter suppression.

  • “I’d actually prefer that the manufacturers be held to the fire than that purchasers be inconvenienced.”

    “Inconvenienced?” Like killed?

  • Liz Miller says:

    Like having to show ID to prove they’re old enough to poison themselves.

  • Barbara Munsey says:

    “I’m in favor of repealing the drug laws and removing the age limit on alcohol.

    The addictiveness and deadliness of cigarettes, and the fact that most people start smoking before they hit 16 makes me less eager to eliminate that age limit, but I’d actually prefer that the manufacturers be held to the fire than that purchasers be inconvenienced.”
    ————————————————————
    Cigs = righteously bad, so okay.

    IMO, morphine in the hands of a geriatric oncologist? Good thing. Morphine unregulated, but the manufacturers taxed, punished, etc? ummmmm……………..

  • edmundburkenator says:

    I’m not sure “higher standard” = “showing id”. I’ll need to think about that one.

    “Higher standards” could also collect a few dogs… tread carefully there.

  • Liz Miller says:

    How does what I said get translated to righteously bad? Cigarettes are deliberately made to be both addictive and poisonous and most smokers start before they are 16. I’d like to see the manufacturers forced to remove the additives that make cigarettes so dangerous, then purchasers won’t need to show ID to buy it.

  • Eric the 1/2 troll says:

    Well being in favor of eliminating drug laws and alcohol age limits but still strongly regul;ating tobacco is a little bit hypocritical.

    Personally, I am for de-criminalizing drugs but continuing their regulation (and taxation) along with reducing the drinking age to 18 again … but after my kids turn 21… :o )

  • Barbara Munsey says:

    Liz, I’m sorry, but removing regs and holding the maker responsible is kind of like the people that want to be able to get damages from gun manufacturers when someone gets shot during a robbery. Zero personal responsibility/choice plus endless trough to feed at, and refusal to acknowledge that bad things happen in the real world regardless of what laws the electeds hand down.

    If you want to eliminate all drug laws, then cigs are no different–they’re drugs, and addictive ones too. Like morphine. Just a lesser degree, and legal over the counter IF you have all the right ID to prove the law says you can purchase the commodity readily available nearly anywhere.

    Eric, I hear you. I became old enough to vote when the drinking law was bouncing around here in VA, and couldn’t argue with the fact that if someone could serve in uniform, VOTE and so on, why couldn’t they be considered eligible to have a beer? I don’t know if 18 is old enough for liquor, but I suspect that SOME 18 year olds would be plenty responsible and some not. Just as some 45 year olds (and 26, 57, 63, 82) are, or aren’t.

  • liz says:

    If cigarettes were simply tobacco rolled in paper, it would be quite a different story. I’m just advocating that the manufacturers be encouraged to return to that state.

    I don’t think it’s hypocritical to ask that manufacturers change their formulae to create a less addictive and dangerous product. After all, we demand that car manufacturers make their products safer. We don’t allow the sale of leaded items for food use or in toys.

  • Barbara Munsey says:

    You’ve been advocating the regulation of something you disagree with.

    Just as those with whom you disagree on contraception, abortion, etc are advocating the regulation of something they may disagree with, in whole or in part.

    It’s still regulation of legal commodities and services.

    And I still think exercising the right and privilege of voting should be held to a higher standard–if not, why bother to register?

  • liz says:

    Hmm, I don’t know that I agree with you Barbara. I’m advocating that people be able to access a product with a minimum of fuss, and I’m advocating that the product be safe.

    Unfettered access to a safe product doesn’t sound like the battle that’s been happening in Richmond.

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