Richmond Dems: “There is Absolutely No Voter Fraud in the Commonwealth – Well, Except for Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here, Here and Here.”

By Lloyd the Idiot

The GA Dems’ continuing and groundless objection to very, very basic and non-intrusive voter ID laws continues to astound me, particularly in light of  38 actual CONVICTIONS  for voter fraud in the 2008 alone and nearly 200 other cases where authorities believed a crime had occurred but the cases were not prosecuted.

Look, guys, if you need the votes of convicts to win  elections,  you really should rethink your message.

 


Comments

  • BlackOut says:

    If as this study illustrates, the problem is felons voting then why isn’t the voter ID bill constructed to fix that? Just pass a bill that says cross reference the rolls against the felon list before an election. Purge the felons before they get on the register. That seems too logical.

    Not sure how having an ID requirement will stop any of the 38 instances illustrated by this wildly exaggerated study.

  • edmundburkenator says:

    Doesn’t this kind of support the point that you don’t need new laws? The argument wasn’t that there was no fraud, I thought, the argument was that we didn’t need additional laws.

  • Can someone please show me the threat to our democratic system in requiring a person to show identification in order to vote?

    And I will answer that question for you: you can’t because it just ain’t there.

  • ACTivist says:

    If we don’t need an I’D to vote, where who we put in office MAKE the laws, then we shouldn’t need an I’D to buy liquor or cigarettes or even lottery tickets big cash winners. You need to take this show on the road to Illinois. They already know why they don’t bring up this issue–there would be decent people in office otherwise.

  • Baron Rosedown says:

    Being required to show a valid picture id and proof of residency is not a threat to our democratic system. In fact it keeps our system from being corrupted and keeps authenticity of our voting system in tact.

    In some countries voters are required to use a finger/thumb print. Sadly this narrative brings up the horrible memories of ACORN.

  • Evan says:

    This is a classic example of missing the point and failing to do a cost/benefit analysis.

    How many legitimate votes are we discouraging or making more difficult and how many fraudulent votes are we preventing through these bills?

    It seems to me that even if we had solid evidence that 50-100 people were impersonating others and voting every single election it still wouldn’t be worth passing bills that make it harder for thousands of legitimate voters to go to the polls.

    Whether it makes sense to me or not, I have to deal with the fact that tons of Virginians make do without an ID in their daily lives, as is their right. Voting, also, is their right, and I’m not going to support disenfranchising people.

  • liz says:

    In Texas, a gun license is valid proof for voting, but college ID is not.

    The problem with voter ID laws is that they are designed to keep people who are poor or homeless or elderly or disabled or who are in college from voting.

    These laws are almost entirely brought by Republicans to keep constituencies who are seen as traditionally Democratic from voting.

    If you REALLY want to prevent voter fraud, look at when and where the votes are counted. That’s where wholesale fraud occurs.

  • Barbara Munsey says:

    I’d like to know who told the felons that it was okay to register because the laws had been fixed and it would all be okay. Talk about ACORN!

    I hope they’re tracking down who did the registration that enabled those folks (on the basis of a lie that they believed) to commit the fraud.

  • edmundburkenator says:

    If Rs would raise the bar at the counting (votes) level and not only at the individual level, the argument that they are only trying to keep the poor, the elderly, the homeless, etc. from voting would go away.

    Why don’t Rs do that and take this arguing point away from the Ds?

  • TCJohnson says:

    Lloyd, one problem with that article.

    “None of the cases appeared to involve someone who misrepresented his or her identity at the polls to vote”

    So the new laws being proposed would not have prevented the type of voter fraud they are prosecuting.

  • Cato the Elder says:

    I read a study somewhere that there were approximately 21 million people in the U.S. without photo ID. Oddly enough, this number closely corresponds to the estimated number of illegal immigrants.

    What a coincidence.

  • Loudoun Insider says:

    Good one, Cato!

    Lloyd, I didn’t count them, but is that 38 heres? Love the title!

    ID to vote is a no brainer, not sure why people are so upset about it.

  • TCJohnson says:

    Cato, yes, a 12 does resemble a 21. THat does not mean that they are the same.

    Most reports I have found said that the number of illegal immigrants is between 11 and 12 million.

  • Ben Dover says:

    While we are flogging the subject of illegal immigrants, did anyone read in the WSJ that demographers believe that the trend of illegals coming to the USA is now reversing itself? Apparently more people are heading home than are coming here.

    Personally, I think that everyone who wants to vote should have a microchip implanted either in their clavicle area, or immediately behind their right ear. This way, a simple handheld scanner (the kind used at ski resorts and amusement parks) could authenticate voters as they enter the polling place.

  • ACTivist says:

    Tons of people. Let’s see. 2 tons is 4000 pounds. An average woman weighs about 135. That’s almost 30 women. Men average 180. That would be a little over 22. Tons of people aren’t many. And, yes, fraud is committed more at the count, especially with computers. Why not eliminate all possible ways for fraud to protect the system because when you don’t, you get jokes like what we have in the WH now. And this crap about the poor, elderly, disabled, blah, blah, blah.. If they really want to vote, not only would they find a way to get there to do it without being told, they would come prepared–including to make sure they had the proper identification. These Dem talking points are only retold lies they created to make them feel good. Show me the friggin’ data from a reputable source or just shut the hell up already.

  • TCJohnson says:

    “While we are flogging the subject of illegal immigrants, did anyone read in the WSJ that demographers believe that the trend of illegals coming to the USA is now reversing itself? Apparently more people are heading home than are coming here.”

    Not in the wall street journal, but I have read that in other places.

    One of the reasons given is that the US economy is so bad they don’t see the point of trying to get into the country.

    That hurts.

  • Wolverine says:

    TC — After watching my immigrant neighbors scam a 2010 US census taker during three consecutive visits until he finally left in disgust, I would suggest that the figures you are seeing may be more than a little low-ball.

  • Cato the Elder says:

    ” trend of illegals coming to the USA is now reversing itself?”

    The President deserves some credit here. It turns out that shitting on the economy is an effective means of discouraging illegal immigration.

  • BlackOut says:

    Look. Logic says focus on the facts. Apparently we have 38 felons that voted in the last election, illegally. There is no arguing felons should not vote.

    Now let’s look at this rationally. If legislatures are raised to a level of concern about 38 voters that they want to do something about it, then do something about the 38. If others think 38 votes ain’t worth the effort then how about talking about roads, education and jobs. The current legislation does neither.

    In the back of my craw is the fact this legislation came from ALEC.

    We have a dysfunctional government.

  • “The problem with voter ID laws is that they are designed to keep people who are poor or homeless or elderly or disabled or who are in college from voting.”

    Well, I disagree with the intent. I believe that, in fact, they do try to discourage people who would otherwise engage in voter fraud. To that extent, the laws thus serve a prophylactic purpose.

    But, let’s look at who would is supposedly being disenfranchised. Even the poor have identification. Same is true of elderly and disabled.

    But the homeless voter is the truly comical one. Think about that. First of all, they don’t have a home, and, therefore, no residence. What district would they vote in anyway? More importantly, though, please don’t suggest that we should sacrifice the integrity of the electoral process to accommodate the mythical homeless person who, while he can’t afford a home, nonetheless has the compelling drive to register to vote and then unsuccessfully attempts to vote because he doesn’t have ID. Ridiculous.

  • BlackOut says:

    OK Lloyd I get the outrage about homeless voting, but where does it say that someone has to have a home to vote?

  • BO, I’m not outraged. I just think disenfranchisement of the homeless is a ridiculous concern in the real world.

  • Actually, most homeless have a very specific location and even a “home” in the most general sense. For instance, the people who are living in SRO motels on Fairfax’s route 50 live in very specific districts. People who are sleeping in their cars regularly park those cars in the same area. People who live in the wooded areas around the Beltway have been in roughly the same location for years, albeit a few hundred meters one way or the other.

    I’m just thinking that if keeping homeless people from voting is your primary reason for this bill, then we really have very little as a society to have to worry about. (And I think most of us think that we do have much to worry about.)

  • Elder Berry says:

    The idea behind this legislation is to keep whoever you want to keep from voting from voting.

    Worked well in the south in the 40s and 50s.

    200 bad votes in the whole state, 38 that could actually be proven, is a ridiculous justification for deliberately reducing voter participation in a democracy.

  • Loudoun Outsider says:

    Most of the voter fraud appears to be convicted felons either voting or registering to vote.

    An interesting question would be how many prior felons convicted to vote would have been eligible to have their voting rights restored?

    My assumption would be a majority of those convicted would have had their right to vote restored if they went through the proper procedure.

    One of the commendable accomplishments of our current Governor is he has tried to help non-violent felons integrate back into society by establishing a routine process for the restoration of civil rights to non-violent felons.

    The process involves submitting a form to the Secretary of the
    Commonwealth. For “garden variety” felonies (aka theft, checks, credit cards), there is a short form. For more serious felonies (such as selling drugs), there is a longer form. Violent criminals need not apply.

    The requirements are you complete your sentence, including probation, restitution and court costs. Depending on your crime you have to wait two or five years to file. You also cannot have had a DWI during the “good” time before your application.

    If you meet the basic criteria, approval is almost automatic.

    The irony is most of the former felons convicted of voter fraud could have voted legally had they applied to have their right to vote restored.

  • “The idea behind this legislation is to keep whoever you want to keep from voting from voting.”

    Yup. Dead people, felons, multiple voters, etc. I DO want to keep them from voting. Arguments about any meaningful negative impact on the electorate are farcical.

  • mosborn says:

    I didn’t get into college because of affirmative action, so can someone tell me what % of 3.7 million 38 is?

    Why should I be required to show a photo ID to vote when I don’t have to show a photo ID to register to vote?

  • There were only 370 murders in Virginia in 2008. Maybe we should just get rid of those laws, too. Seems we really don’t need them much.

  • Blackout says:

    Lloyd, if we had proof of:

    “Yup. Dead people, felons, multiple voters, etc. I DO want to keep them from voting. Arguments about any meaningful negative impact on the electorate are farcical.”

    …then we would have justification debating this solution looking for a problem. More wasted cycles on things unrelated to transportation, budget and jobs.

  • G.Stone says:

    Lloyd has the intellectual high ground here, and is making most of you look foolish. Lloyd wins. Next topic.

  • TCJohnson says:

    Still hasn’t address the fact that the current bill would not have stopped a single one of those cases of voter fraud he is talking about.

    So what cases of voter fraud are these laws trying to prevent?

  • RichmondDem says:

    Do you really not know the difference between voter fraud and voter REGISTRATION fraud?

  • RichmondDem says:

    Since you do, then I guess you will be changing the title of this post, right?

  • NotJohnSMosby says:

    White people still get to vote, right?

  • Yes, they do, NJM, but get to the polls early because there’s a quota.

  • enviroman says:

    I think we need to require proof that an individual is still living in a district in order to vote in that district. We can’t abide anybody voting in the wrong district!

    We know district-crossing happens, but it needs to stop!

    My proposal to clamp down on all of this district-crossing is to require ALL voters to get a new i.d. within 30 days of voting. If you don’t have proof that your residence is currently in the district – no vote!

    It may be a bit burdensome, and a lot of people may not go to the trouble, but it’s worth it if we get an absolutely pure and fraud-free election!

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